What book are you reading ...

Colesman Ballz

Well-known Exeweb poster
Joined
Dec 28, 2014
Messages
8,132
Loads Al...One of the best I have seen written for a branch line.
I had a wonderful book on the Teign Valley Line,which was exhaustive of the line & full of pictures.
Only one edition was done(£35,but worth it)
I lent it to a friend who was ill & then sadly passed away.It subsequently got lost in the clear out of his flat ☹
View attachment 3391View attachment 3392
John Owen wrote two excellent branch line histories, on (i) the Exe Valley branch and (ii) the Mortenhampstead line. A friend of mine called Freddie Huxtable (no relation, honestly !) has just completed his labour of love, "The Taunton to Barnstaple Line", which must be the most comprehensive history ever written. It has extended to 724 pages over 3 volumes in large format at £25 each. There may even be an appendix to cover all the additional photos he has received following the publication of the first two volumes.

Olds if you want me to keep an eye open for a second hand copy of the Teign Valley Book when events start happening again, just PM me. Or the Abbotsbury or Portland lines.
 

iscalad

Very well known Exeweb poster
Joined
Aug 22, 2007
Messages
15,607
Location
Far away across the field
John Owen wrote two excellent branch line histories, on (i) the Exe Valley branch and (ii) the Mortenhampstead line. A friend of mine called Freddie Huxtable (no relation, honestly !) has just completed his labour of love, "The Taunton to Barnstaple Line", which must be the most comprehensive history ever written. It has extended to 724 pages over 3 volumes in large format at £25 each. There may even be an appendix to cover all the additional photos he has received following the publication of the first two volumes.

Olds if you want me to keep an eye open for a second hand copy of the Teign Valley Book when events start happening again, just PM me. Or the Abbotsbury or Portland lines.
I remember going on a Sunday school outing from Moretonhampstead in the late 50s. The line was re-opened especially for us.
 

Stuffy

Well-known Exeweb poster
Joined
Apr 18, 2009
Messages
8,339
Location
Swindon
Stuffy
Genuine and (I promise) non political question but, as an aviator yourself, did you ever come across a book called "Stick and Rudder", written back in 1944 by a German trainer (yes, I know) but still, apparently, regarded by many (at least in the Flight Sim community) as a fantastic basic primer in the mechanics of, at least, basic aviation in GA aircraft.
I had a "Kindle" copy for quite a while but it suddenly disappeared as, it seems, is no longer available.
Hard copies do appear still to be available (although of sometimes dubious provenance) but seem highly expensive.
Even as primarily someone who "flies from his man-cave" - mainly on XPlane 11 (on VR - it's fantastic) and also - just now - on the new Microsoft job - I have enjoyed a few (highly expensive!!) co-piloting trips in a C172 from EGTE so do have the flying bug.
But, back to question. As an obviously experienced aviator. Have you even come across the book? And, in your professional opinion, is it worth the expense -rather than a once-free internet browse?
Stick and rudder is a book I've never come across before but checking out the title on Amazon (which you've probably done) copies go for £17 or £13 (used) The author is said to be Wolfgang Langewiesche. Whether these books are of dubious provenance I really don't Know. There is also a copy printed in the USA that will set you back just shy of £2000.
Me an experienced aviator? I was certainly an Army Air Despatch Crew Commander (No1) who was in radio contact with the pilot during supply drops. My duties changed from a week where I would receive ammo, food and clothing and divvy it out to the sections detailed to prepare it for air drop. Another week my crew loaded the aircraft(s) during the evening and did supply drop the following day. On isolated occasions we entered the nearby jungle looking for Indonesian paratroops rumoured to have dropped in the area. Nearly all our supply drops from RAF Labuan were from Argosy or Beverley aircraft. Please go to my link and click on 'Air Despatch which will show the No1 despatcher preparing to inform the pilot/navigator where the load landed.

 

Greyhound

Well-known Exeweb poster
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
5,891
Location
The Doghouse
A very steep hill between Dorchester and Bridport if you follow the road but maybe they would have gone round it.
I imagine they'd have gone a mile or two inland for a flatter route. There's also that nasty hill leading down into Chideock, with its 30 mph speed limit sign at the bottom!
 

Alistair20000

Very well known Exeweb poster
Joined
May 5, 2009
Messages
35,169
Location
Hunkered down
I imagine they'd have gone a mile or two inland for a flatter route. There's also that nasty hill leading down into Chideock, with its 30 mph speed limit sign at the bottom!
Ah yes that bleddy hill with the speed cameras that forced me to the driver awareness course. :(
 

Avening Posse

Well-known Exeweb poster
Joined
Dec 31, 2013
Messages
8,975
Location
Sydney
Morbo. A book about football culture in Spain. Mixes football with politics and the different cultural outlooks in all the different regions across the country. Fascinating if you like that sort of thing, which I do. Not just about the big clubs, plenty about lesser known regional clubs too. A bit dated as written in 2003 but still very good.
 
Top