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Egg

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She might be more successful in getting more cash than a short term uninfluential Lib Dem MP who will inevitably lose at a subsequent GE.
The Tories have pledged to find more money for Mid Devon schools before. Back in 2010 the then education minister Michael Gove promised to visit Tiverton High School in person to see what needed to be done. Needless to say, he never kept this promise.
 

Alistair20000

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Are you suggesting that putting up pensions to match inflation is not a good thing?
Good things are admirable if they can be afforded. Ends without means is Utopian.

I am suggesting that the country has some serious questions to ask itself with inflation running amok, unions orchestrating strikes, economic problems and shortages of goods affecting the whole world. The idea that we can keep on paying ourselves ever increasing wages and pensions is for the birds.

Do you remember the 1970’s or were you too young ?
 

Avening Posse

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She says she'll get more money for roads and schools in Tiverton and Honiton. Roads and schools are funded by the Conservative-controlled county council, which is funded by the Tory government. Helen seems oblivious to this.
Fair points and easy from me from afar and not living in the UK anymore. I have heard over and over complaints about lots of career politicians doing the Oxbridge PPP degree thing and not having any experience outside of that bubble, so for me I like seeing locals who may not know all the political nuances and strategy looking at things from a different perspective. And people like that need to be given a chance so they can learn and bring “outside the bubble” stuff to the table. Not saying that’s her especially as don’t know much about her, but it could be? (And others of all political persuasions like her)
 

angelic upstart

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Good things are admirable if they can be afforded. Ends without means is Utopian.

I am suggesting that the country has some serious questions to ask itself with inflation running amok, unions orchestrating strikes, economic problems and shortages of goods affecting the whole world. The idea that we can keep on paying ourselves ever increasing wages and pensions is for the birds.

Do you remember the 1970’s or were you too young ?
I agree, re pensions. Which is why it makes little sense to me. Outside of trying to win votes. If people are worried about vulnerability, up pension credit and it's problem partially solved.

The govt has said themselves, that they want a high wage economy. How is this possible without keeping up wage increases with inflation?

Nope, was too young for the 70's. But remember having no electricity or gas in the early 80s.
 

IndoMike

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I have covered many by-elections and Hurford is the worst candidate I have found. Initially she says she wants to share “all my ideas and my aspirations for the Tiverton and Honiton”. The definite article is singular to her; she considers everything from her own perspective; her speech.

From your article.


The comment about the definite article is totally incorrect.
Firstly, you can't say "for the Tiverton and Honiton" anyway. (Did the writer misquote?)
Secondly, it should be for "the Tiverton and Honiton area/constituency "
Thirdly, if she had used the example above ("secondly..") the use of "the" would not in any way suggest that she is only seeing things from her perspective.

I would not vote for this lady under any circumstances, but I do believe in being fair.
 

Egg

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The comment about the definite article is totally incorrect.
I think you're mistaken. As I read it, the writer is saying Hurford only considers the definite article, ie the Tiverton and Honiton, from her own perspective ['my ideas and aspirations'] and not from the perspective of her prospective constituents.
Firstly, you can't say "for the Tiverton and Honiton" anyway. (Did the writer misquote?)
No, that's the writer's point – Hurford can't string a coherent sentence together.
Secondly, it should be for "the Tiverton and Honiton area/constituency."
Plainly, it should but, again, the writer is quoting Hurford.
Thirdly, if she had used the example above ("secondly..") the use of "the" would not in any way suggest that she is only seeing things from her perspective
As previously.
 

IndoMike

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Would it be right for me as a lawyer to demand a 11% wage rise and go on strike if my employer refused? Clearly not as that would seriously prejudice the position of my clients which I would not be willing to do under any circumstances. The RMT has no such qualms about preventing their own 'clients' from getting to work which will in turn impact the return their employers get from them leading to wage stagnation and potentially redundancies.

Edit: Criminal law barristers are however going on strike. That is because they genuinely are poorly paid (when compared to the overall legal sector and in any event probably less than the average RMT member) and the Crown Court will adjourn hearings rather than allow criminal law proceedings to go ahead in the absence of professional representation.
So your second paragraph rather contradicts your first one, Phil, as you are aware.

How much salary a worker is paid is very subjective. Obviously hours worked per week, overtime obligations, shift work, degree of difficulty, risk, and qualifications (although not everyone has equal opportunity to attain those qualifications) all play a part. And we have learned that in times of emergency essential workers are indeed essential. I don't suppose many lawyers
risked getting Covid while fulfilling their work obligations, but many essential workers did.

You talk about the ethics of striking. Do you think the current Govt has provide a good example of ethical behaviour? Isn't it the case that they have created a "feck everyone else,
we'll do as we please and look after number one". They say the average railway worker salary is around 30k. After tax etc. that's probably around 25k. If you have a wife and a couple of kids that doesn't sound so great to me, and it might also include unsocial hours and other inconveniences.

In a democracy a worker is/should be entitled to withdraw his labour - going unpaid, of course - if he thinks the terms and conditions of his work are unfair or if he feels
his job or the job of his colleagues is being threatened. The usual emotional blackmail is being applied, of course : what about the poor people who can't get to work? - the Tory papers scream. We have had 12 years of Tory austerity, which has made everyone poorer. Where is the gain from the years of austerity? Tell me what aspect of British society is better now than 12 years ago.

The people have had enough, and now they're fighting back. I wish them well.
 

IndoMike

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I think you're mistaken. As I read it, the writer is saying Hurford only considers the definite article, ie the Tiverton and Honiton, from her own perspective ['my ideas and aspirations'] and not from the perspective of her prospective constituents.
No, that's the writer's point – Hurford can't string a coherent sentence together.
Plainly, it should but, again, the writer is quoting Hurford.

As previously.
Sorry Egg, but

1. If she can't use the definite article correctly that only means she cannot speak English well. And she is not alone : standards in the use of English have generally fallen considerably, typified by the dreadful "could of/should of" instead of "could have/ should have". But, a caveat, there is a certain amount of poetic licence when speaking compared with when writing, and it does depend on the degree of formality required.

2. I repeat, even if she had used the "the" correctly, it does not in any way imply that she is seeing things from her own perspective only. We use "the" in this case only because we are *defining which area. Are we taking about any area? No. Which area are we talking about? The Tiverton and Honiton one..
*This is why we call it the definite article : it defines.

PS. Hants, I know the above sounds like a grammar class, but it is directly connected to politics, since I an defending the integrity of a Tory candidate (believe it or not).
 
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