Politics Today

DB9

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There's a fair few job losses (25%of all track workers) they are trying to stop. I don't think those affected will see that as a tack on. Of course as with all negotiations there's things people will drop.

Worth noting most of the workers striking haven't received a pay rise in 3 years and the average salary for an RMT member is 31k.
The rail workers were lauded by the Government during the pandemic for keeping the railways going, They were seen as "Key Workers" just like the NHS staff, Fast forward 2 years and they're all "Communists" 🤷
 

Colesman Ballz

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With Boris off to Rwanda for the Commonwealth Conference, perhaps he could demonstrate his concerns for global warming and the dire economic climate by flying on the "Priti Tours Express" instead of them using two separate planes ? :cool:
 

angelic upstart

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Wonder why Boorish wanted to take back control (cough, cough) while 28 other European nations didn't. What makes the UK so different?
Oddly enough, a friend and I discussed this last night. I'd just like to say we're training for a 100km walk in a few months so literally spend hours dribbling nonsense, I rarely talk politics in the real world. Anyway we both agreed that we're British and a different being from mainland Europe, we're an island race, we don't feel European, nor have we ever. We have a totally different culture to most of Europe in almost every way. Now you could say this about France (as an example), but France has neighbours and those that live by the border will visit friends and family just a few miles away in a different country. We don't have that in the same way.

It's easy to blame xenophobia, or whatever else on things like Brexit, but we were never fully into the EU in the first place. Nor were we likely to be anytime soon. Nothing to do with the papers, or being right wing, or hating immigration, we just ain't European in the traditional sense.
 

geoffwp

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Oddly enough, a friend and I discussed this last night. I'd just like to say we're training for a 100km walk in a few months so literally spend hours dribbling nonsense, I rarely talk politics in the real world. Anyway we both agreed that we're British and a different being from mainland Europe, we're an island race, we don't feel European, nor have we ever. We have a totally different culture to most of Europe in almost every way. Now you could say this about France (as an example), but France has neighbours and those that live by the border will visit friends and family just a few miles away in a different country. We don't have that in the same way.

It's easy to blame xenophobia, or whatever else on things like Brexit, but we were never fully into the EU in the first place. Nor were we likely to be anytime soon. Nothing to do with the papers, or being right wing, or hating immigration, we just ain't European in the traditional sense.
Interesting read AU but too much of a generalisation for me to tick its box.
 

Spoonz Red E

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Oddly enough, a friend and I discussed this last night. I'd just like to say we're training for a 100km walk in a few months so literally spend hours dribbling nonsense, I rarely talk politics in the real world. Anyway we both agreed that we're British and a different being from mainland Europe, we're an island race, we don't feel European, nor have we ever. We have a totally different culture to most of Europe in almost every way. Now you could say this about France (as an example), but France has neighbours and those that live by the border will visit friends and family just a few miles away in a different country. We don't have that in the same way.

It's easy to blame xenophobia, or whatever else on things like Brexit, but we were never fully into the EU in the first place. Nor were we likely to be anytime soon. Nothing to do with the papers, or being right wing, or hating immigration, we just ain't European in the traditional sense.
Some resonance there.

But it begs the question.

If those feelings are innate why has so much concerted effort been invested in the anti European narrative over the past few decades by large sections of the printed press and a large - but not majority - fringe of the Conservative party? It's certainly ramped up a few notches in my own lived experience since the mid til late 80s.
Why the fear from those quarters of the 'naturally' convinced not being actually convinced?
 
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