Politics Today

tavyred

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But aren't PCC's by their nature political? They're voted in standing for a certain political party. To me they're a waste of time and no one knows their local one in the main and when it comes time to elected them the turn out is pitiful.
I think the idea is that an individual PCC can exercise a political bent in their strategic oversight of their local force but to comment on and ergo pressure the police in an individual investigation is not part of their role, or it isn’t as I understand it.
To see how these situations should be handled, compare and contrast Khan with the Durham PCC. 😉
 

arthur

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Certainly is tedious, Tav.

Today no doubt the airwaves will be full of more insincere ‘apologies’ - not for the wanton lawbreaking, but for the blatant lying about it afterwards. Hopefully, he’ll cling onto power and stumble on ….
Do you think Tavy will ever get this? He and his ilk seem fixated on the activities in Durham and London, drawing false equivalences between them and saying there only of any import because they've been overly politicised and most people don't care that much anyway (doubtful, but we'll let that go).

But the big issue is Johnson's lying to the Commons - "I was in a room groaning with empty bottles with people sitting on each others laps, but there were no parties and all rules were followed at all times". Still, I suppose if you are ardent fan of direct democracy, the House of Commons doesn't matter that much anyway. It's full of politicians who all lie, so why pick on just one of them?
 

DB9

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I think the idea is that an individual PCC can exercise a political bent in their strategic oversight of their local force but to comment on and ergo pressure the police in an individual investigation is not part of their role, or it isn’t as I understand it.
To see how these situations should be handled, compare and contrast Khan with the Durham PCC. 😉
Putting pressure on in any circumstances is wrong, I'm hoping that No10 didn't put pressure on the out going Met Chief or possible new one to get the result they wanted? That I guess we'll never know.
 

arthur

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Putting pressure on in any circumstances is wrong, I'm hoping that No10 didn't put pressure on the out going Met Chief or possible new one to get the result they wanted? That I guess we'll never know.
Talking of political interference...

Boris Johnson’s attempt to appoint a former Metropolitan police commissioner into another senior police role has prompted a furious backlash from three high-profile victims of the VIP paedophile ring scandal.

The widow of the late former home secretary Leon Brittan, the family of the late war hero Lord Bramall, and the former Tory MP Harvey Proctor have demanded that the prime minister reconsider whether Bernard Hogan-Howe is suitable to be the head of the National Crime Agency after presiding over the disastrous Operation Midland.

Johnson, a close associate of Hogan-Howe, has requested that he is considered for the role, despite his rejection by an independent panel. At present, there is a shortlist of two highly qualified police chiefs who had been interviewed by Priti Patel, the home secretary.


Boris Johnson is understood to have been unhappy that Lord Hogan-Howe, the former Metropolitan Police commissioner, who has supported him politically, did not reach the final round.

Two highly qualified candidates, who made it through a five-month process for a final “fireside chat” with Priti Patel, the home secretary, were told last week that they had not got the job. Government sources confirmed that Neil Basu, a Metropolitan Police assistant commissioner, and Graeme Biggar, the interim director-general of the NCA, had been informed that the recruitment process would be reopened.

It is also likely to be awkward for the home secretary given that so many senior policing leaders saw Basu as the best qualified person for the job. Many believe that Basu, a former head of counterterrorism, would have been the clear frontrunner had he not upset Johnson by being outspoken about matters of race.




(Please forward to Tavy for his consideration)
 
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lamrobhero

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For normal criminal investigations there is a legal requirement for a paper trail in relation to the conduct of an investigation to facilitate disclosure to the defence if it gets to court. Also the file will get sent to the Crown Prosecution Service for consideration. A decision not to prosecute could be on the basis either that there was insufficient evidence or that whilst there was sufficient evidence as a matter of policy it would not be pursued.

In relation to Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) I do not know what the procedure would be. If I was to be issued with a FPN for dropping litter for example I imagine that would be it procedure wise. Although I would have the option of challenging it in court.

The point of FPNs is that they are intended to be simple to use with no big bureaucratic burden.
 

IndoMike

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With 2 or 3 posters today stating categorically that they are sick to the teeth with Johnson, I was wondering what effect the Johnson regime is having on the health of the nation.
Being exposed to a constant feed of lies and bull turd can lead to frustration, anger, and resentment , none of which is good for the soul, the heart or the mind.
 

Alistair20000

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Just thought I'd check - here's what the BBC said in 2011

Labour leader Ed Miliband is supporting the Yes campaign for changing the electoral system, believing it is fairer than the current situation and good for democracy and accountability.

Other senior figures such as Alan Johnson also support AV, but the party as a whole is divided on the issue, with more than 100 Labour MPs saying they oppose such a change.

Several current shadow cabinet members, including John Healey and Caroline Flint, as well former ministers such as David Blunkett, Lord Prescott and Margaret Beckett, are actively campaigning against AV.

Gordon Brown offered the Lib Dems a referendum on voting reform as part of their own coalition negotiations after May's election.

The party flirted with voting reform as an issue before coming to power in 1997, asking the late Lord Jenkins to head a review into the subject.

But his conclusions in 1998 were largely ignored and critics say Labour only returned to the issue when the party looked set to leave power.


The last two sentences are telling. And the party's diehard refuseniks like Blunkett, Prescott and Straw still held sway against what was obviously a weak leader. Interesting that the loathsome Flint was on the wrong side of the debate - not in the least bit surprising!

No art, not having that. :mad: You mean the fragrant Flint.
 

Alistair20000

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To deflect from Grey watch out for these manoeuvres from Bunter the Big Dog:

1. Announces windfall tax on energy companies.

2. Orders The Dish to find money down the back of the sofa to help with energy bills.

3. Announces more aid to Ukraine.

4. Announces Carrie is up the duff.
 

Rosencrantz

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To deflect from Grey watch out for these manoeuvres from Bunter the Big Dog:

1. Announces windfall tax on energy companies.

2. Orders The Dish to find money down the back of the sofa to help with energy bills.

3. Announces more aid to Ukraine.

4. Announces Carrie is up the duff.
You have to feel sorry for Big Dog. Every time he turned up and grabbed a glass of bubbly, tables loaded by bottles of grog and party snacks, to address them on work issues he left before all the fun happened and no one told him that fun was going on, in the very same building. How was he supposed to know law breaking of his own laws was going on and making it look like he was misleading parliament when asked about it. And now all this fuss about trust. He must be the unluckiest PM in history.
 
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