Politics Today

Hermann

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We have lived under the Magna Carta for 700 years and that guarantees people's liberty.
The only thing Magna Carta guarantees for people is trial by jury. The remaining clauses still in use protect the church and the city of London.
 

Hermann

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You don't know what habeas corpus is then?
You don't know that habeas corpus stems from the 1166 Assize of Clarendon, 50 years before Magna Carta, then? And that neither remain in law having been superceded by subsequent acts of Parliament?
 
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Mr Jinx

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Interesting article in the Tele today titled:

"While we tie ourselves up in environmental regulations, China is taking advantage."

"No wonder President Xi doesn’t want to come to Cop26. He wouldn’t be able to stop himself laughing."

I'll spare going into detail, the summary above is sufficient. If you're not laughing yourself, you'll be crying.
 

Hermann

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Back to Johnson's sleepover, the line from Downing Street that they didn't break any rules, but refusing to say whether or not she stayed. Nimco Ali is saying identical things, i.e. not that she didn't stay, but that it wasn't a breach of the rules. That implies to me that she certainly did stay. Given that, I'm not sure how Johnson and co. expect to put this to bed without (1) admitting she stayed over, and (2) justifying why that is not a breach of the rules.

One might say that if they have nothing to hide they should cut straight to that bit, but it appears to be Johnson's natural inclination to hide the truth if it makes him look vaguely bad, and hope everyone forgets about it. This is similar to the "who paid for the refurbishment" debacle, where Johnson's refusal to answer the question made it seem like a much bigger deal than it was when he eventually did admit it.
 

angelic upstart

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Take no notice Hermann had already mentioned it.

In short, we don't live under the Magna Carta for anyone that cares.
 

tonykellowfan

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But not how to get your facts right
Here's the British Library website for you:

Habeas Corpus is an Act of Parliament, still in force today, which ensures that no one can be imprisoned unlawfully. Literally translated, ‘habeas corpus’ means ‘you may have the body’ (if legal procedures are satisfied). This sounds like a strange phrase, but in medieval times it was the expression used to bring a prisoner into court. It later became used to fight against arbitrary detention by the authorities.

In 1215 Magna Carta stated that no one could be imprisoned unlawfully, and the first recorded use of this provision was in 1305, but Habeas Corpus as we know it today was not made law until 1679. Although the law is still in effect, Habeas Corpus has not been continually used since 1679. It was suspended in 1793 when there were concerns that the French Revolution might inspire rebellion in England. It was also suspended several times in the 20th century. Internment (detention without charge) was employed in World War I and II, and during many periods of the conflict in Northern Ireland in the later 20th century. Today, detention without charge is back on the political agenda in the debates surrounding anti-terror legislation.
 
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