Politics Today

IndoMike

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Sturgeon runs the same playbook in Scotland with the Saltire. It's not an exclusive right-wing trick.
Yes, you're probably right. It's just that seeing Trump swooning over the flag plus the extreme right in the UK and US constantly adorned with their flag makes it seem that it is specific to the right wing
 

IndoMike

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Sturgeon runs the same playbook in Scotland with the Saltire. It's not an exclusive right-wing trick.
One day we need to have a discussion about what "I love my country" actually means and entails. ItWhat actually is nationalism? And is it good to be a nationalist? It seems to.me that to declare you love your country can be like having a pass to do some unpleasant things.
 

angelic upstart

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The perception of the flag being “owned” by the right is probably correct. But equally the dislike of the flag by the left is equally true, in the UK. This needs to change. The flag is everyone’s, just like our club.
 

RedPaul

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Yes, you're probably right. It's just that seeing Trump swooning over the flag plus the extreme right in the UK and US constantly adorned with their flag makes it seem that it is specific to the right wing
I think 'flag waving' generally has taken an upturn. I take Art's point from earlier in the day that a leader or politician can't be photographed (however informally) without flags in the background. All those summits and bilateral press conferences now take place to a background of flags. They never used to, from memory. Did Thatcher and Reagan stand in front of flags all the time? Bush and Blair?
 

angelic upstart

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One day we need to have a discussion about what "I love my country" actually means and entails. ItWhat actually is nationalism? And is it good to be a nationalist? It seems to.me that to declare you love your country can be like having a pass to do some unpleasant things.
I’ll bring this back to the football club analogy, a number of fans will support the club, hate the rivals and be all jingoistic about it. The majority won’t, but don’t like ECFC any less. Being proud of ones country shouldn’t even be thought of politically.
 

angelic upstart

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I think 'flag waving' generally has taken an upturn. I take Art's point from earlier in the day that a leader or politician can't be photographed (however informally) without flags in the background. All those summits and bilateral press conferences now take place to a background of flags. They never used to, from memory. Did Thatcher and Reagan stand in front of flags all the time? Bush and Blair?
They always did! We just see more of it now, particularly during Covid as the press conferences are inside (which makes no sense, but that’s for the lockdown thread)
 

IndoMike

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The perception of the flag being “owned” by the right is probably correct. But equally the dislike of the flag by the left is equally true, in the UK. This needs to change. The flag is everyone’s, just like our club.
I don't see any distasteful actions against the flag by any non- nationalists
I haven't seen images of people burning the flag.in the streets.
 

IndoMike

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I think 'flag waving' generally has taken an upturn. I take Art's point from earlier in the day that a leader or politician can't be photographed (however informally) without flags in the background. All those summits and bilateral press conferences now take place to a background of flags. They never used to, from memory. Did Thatcher and Reagan stand in front of flags all the time? Bush and Blair?
My comments were not referring to government institutions or representatives accompanied by the flag, I was more referring to right-wing nationalists weaponising the flag. As I have said above, the flag/nation is not the property of any one particular group. Brandishing the flag
does not give any one person any moral high ground, superiority or greater degree of patriotism- but many think it does.
 

Oldsmobile-88

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In RaWZ we trust....Amen.
The Union Flag has been watered down in importance to many in the country purely down to the rise in nationalism in Scotland & to a lesser extent Wales.Also the Cross of St George flag is seen more these days than I can ever remember(post 1995)

I can’t recall there ever being the reverence for the Union flag as there is for the Stars & Stripes amongst all political persuasions across the pond.

Unfortunately nowadays,flags cause a disproportionate amount of aggravation for no gain to anyone in the UK...The nonsense in NI a couple of years ago was a prime example.
 

arthur

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Nope, pretty much always happened.
I was prepared to say thanks AU for clarifying this and putting me right, but I thought I'd have a quick google because I wasn't entirely convinced. And I found these two former chancellors speaking from their offices:

41684169
 
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