Paul Tisdale's Website - His Time At ECFC

The Proper Chap

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Courtesy of www.paultisdale.com:

In 2006 Paul became the new manager of Exeter City FC.

A club fresh out of CVA, Exeter City had recently been procured by its own supporters - The Supporters Trust. The immediate challenge was promotion back to the EFL but the vision was far greater. In the highly competitive National Conference League, Exeter City functioned as a cash flow business, supported by ailing facilities. Faced with an academy in crisis (exposed to losing it’s young talent to it’s competitors following the club’s relegation from the EFL) the challenge of lifting Exeter City permanently out of it’s depression with a winning brand of football combined with business savvy was a complex one.

The new ownership model demanded a strict financial framework and encouraged a defined purpose of producing its own talent.

Paul worked closely alongside Steve Perryman (Director of Football) and pivotal club figurehead JulianTagg (chairman) to lead Exeter City through a comprehensive rebuilding process on and off the pitch. The first five years saw Exeter City rise to its highest ever league finish (8th in League 1 in 2011) courtesy of two promotions. This included two play off finals at Wembley - the Club’s first ever appearances at the national stadium. Without question, Paul had made his mark in football management, re establishing Exeter City back into the Football League in the process.

A further spell in League two followed. With only minimal investment from the owners, the need for the club to become commercially viable became Paul’s next focus. The development of talent from the academy into saleable assets brought a series of million pound transfers, creating a revenue stream unprecedented at League two level. In fact, of all the money budgeted as a base spend on players over Paul’s 12 years, roughly 50% was recouped on player sales.

There more successes on the pitch, highlights included a memorable 2:2 home draw with Liverpool in the FA Cup in 2016 and a total of 6 wins versus local archrivals Plymouth Argyle. Two more play off final appearances in 2017 & 2018 concluded an illustrious career at Exeter City FC. Paul is regarded as Exeter City’s most successful manager of all time.

By the time Paul left the club, he had the accolade of being the longest serving football manager in English Football with over 600 matches in charge. However, arguably Paul’s greatest achievement at Exeter City FC was his success in developing an environment conducive to attractive football philosophies and a productive academy, whilst working within a tighter financial model than almost all of the club’s competitors. In addition, continual improvements to the training ground and stadium facilities throughout his tenure alludes to the contribution made not just to the football but to the club in general.
 
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Grecian2K

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We are the grandchildren of apes, not angels
To be fair he has displayed a smidgeon of modesty by not highlighting some of his more miraculous (and cost saving) achievements while at SJP.

For example the way he turned water into wine for his post-promotion celebrations.

Or managed to provide catering for every home match using a mere two loaves and five fishes.

Self effacing to the core was our Paul.
 

Colesman Ballz

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Dec 28, 2014
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Courtesy of www.paultisdale.com:

In 2006 Paul became the new manager of Exeter City FC.

A club fresh out of CVA, Exeter City had recently been procured by its own supporters - The Supporters Trust. The immediate challenge was promotion back to the EFL but the vision was far greater. In the highly competitive National Conference League, Exeter City functioned as a cash flow business, supported by ailing facilities. Faced with an academy in crisis (exposed to losing it’s young talent to it’s competitors following the club’s relegation from the EFL) the challenge of lifting Exeter City permanently out of it’s depression with a winning brand of football combined with business savvy was a complex one.

The new ownership model demanded a strict financial framework and encouraged a defined purpose of producing its own talent.

Paul worked closely alongside Steve Perryman (Director of Football) and pivotal club figurehead JulianTagg (chairman) to lead Exeter City through a comprehensive rebuilding process on and off the pitch. The first five years saw Exeter City rise to its highest ever league finish (8th in League 1 in 2011) courtesy of two promotions. This included two play off finals at Wembley - the Club’s first ever appearances at the national stadium. Without question, Paul had made his mark in football management, re establishing Exeter City back into the Football League in the process.

A further spell in League two followed. With only minimal investment from the owners, the need for the club to become commercially viable became Paul’s next focus. The development of talent from the academy into saleable assets brought a series of million pound transfers, creating a revenue stream unprecedented at League two level. In fact, of all the money budgeted as a base spend on players over Paul’s 12 years, roughly 50% was recouped on player sales.

There more successes on the pitch, highlights included a memorable 2:2 home draw with Liverpool in the FA Cup in 2016 and a total of 6 wins versus local archrivals Plymouth Argyle. Two more play off final appearances in 2017 & 2018 concluded an illustrious career at Exeter City FC. Paul is regarded as Exeter City’s most successful manager of all time.

By the time Paul left the club, he had the accolade of being the longest serving football manager in English Football with over 600 matches in charge. However, arguably Paul’s greatest achievement at Exeter City FC was his success in developing an environment conducive to attractive football philosophies and a productive academy, whilst working within a tighter financial model than almost all of the club’s competitors. In addition, continual improvements to the training ground and stadium facilities throughout his tenure alludes to the contribution made not just to the football but to the club in general.
Pass me the sick bucket ! He was good but not that good.
 

dontpassback

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Dec 30, 2015
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He was good for ECFC no doubt and the early days were good times,but its a shame that when he left there was a sour ending,but like anything in life you remember the good times and put the not so good times on the back burner
 
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