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jrg333

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May 14, 2017
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It wasn't glossed over. It was reported all over the place and he was given a red card. He was wrong to say it and has been punished. What's your problem?
The story didn't even make the front page of the BBC sport site. But when a 13 year old called Rashford a "black ba****d" it was on the front page of the national news. My problem is that we treat actions very differently depending on the supposed victim. Rashford said 'it's the worst of humanity' when fellow footballers received anonymous, rude message. I don't think he's made a comment yet on this professional footballer calling someone a fa**ot while wearing his club's kit and on the pitch.

The double standards. That's my problem. We ask ourselves 'who is the victim and what do they look like?' before we judge the behaviour. It's identity politics and it's been slowly ruining political discourse for a good couple of decades.
 

John William

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The story didn't even make the front page of the BBC sport site. But when a 13 year old called Rashford a "black ba****d" it was on the front page of the national news. My problem is that we treat actions very differently depending on the supposed victim. Rashford said 'it's the worst of humanity' when fellow footballers received anonymous, rude message. I don't think he's made a comment yet on this professional footballer calling someone a fa**ot while wearing his club's kit and on the pitch.

The double standards. That's my problem. We ask ourselves 'who is the victim and what do they look like?' before we judge the behaviour. It's identity politics and it's been slowly ruining political discourse for a good couple of decades.
'twas ever thus. There is a great song by Steve Earle with a telling line about the US -

"I didn't even make the papers, 'cause I only killed one man"

Same here, on a different scale of course. These days, given the decline of real journalism, if it doesn't involve a "celebrity" or give an opportunity to gain advertising clicks by attacking someone in politics, it is unlikely to attract much attention.
 

IndoMike

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For jrg 333

I get what you're saying. The fact is repeatedly sending racist comments to footballers on Twitter etc is wrong and a footballer calling another player a f____t is wrong. The fact the first example gets a lot more attention still doesn't make the cause of the attention acceptable. It's not a surprise that famous people get more coverage than less famous people. If the case of the homophobic comment had occurred in a Chelsea v Man U game for example it would have attracted a lot more publicity. But as far as I can see the homophobic comment incident has attracted attention
 

Pobbop

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Jun 1, 2008
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The story didn't even make the front page of the BBC sport site. But when a 13 year old called Rashford a "black ba****d" it was on the front page of the national news. My problem is that we treat actions very differently depending on the supposed victim. Rashford said 'it's the worst of humanity' when fellow footballers received anonymous, rude message. I don't think he's made a comment yet on this professional footballer calling someone a fa**ot while wearing his club's kit and on the pitch.

The double standards. That's my problem. We ask ourselves 'who is the victim and what do they look like?' before we judge the behaviour. It's identity politics and it's been slowly ruining political discourse for a good couple of decades.
Nah it's pointless whataboutism and use of irritating phrases like "identity politics" that has ruined political discourse for a good couple of dacades...
 
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