Heads up - the risks of heading the ball

IBA

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I'm not sure what the answer is to the problem associated with heading.

If for example, teams volunteer to reduce heading the ball in training, then that gives a distinct advantage to those teams that ignore this dictate.

If the risks are potentially as serious as claimed then the only solution would be to ban heading altogether. including in competitive matches.
Under this scenario I'm struggling to envisage what we would be left with ...
 

Pete Martin (CTID)

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I'm not sure what the answer is to the problem associated with heading.

If for example, teams volunteer to reduce heading the ball in training, then that gives a distinct advantage to those teams that ignore this dictate.

If the risks are potentially as serious as claimed then the only solution would be to ban heading altogether. including in competitive matches.
Under this scenario I'm struggling to envisage what we would be left with ...
I was listening to a discussion about this a few days ago, on LBC. There was an interview with Geoff Hurst who is heading (pun intended) the campaign to look into the effects and come up with a proposal.

It was generally agreed (even by Hurst hmself) that there is a significant difference now with the modern ball, particularly in regard to the older version which was a heavier and which literally soaked up water. The modern ball doesn't do that. I agree it is a conundrum and football, without heading the ball, is a bit unthinkable. The main thrust at the moment seems to be to ban, or limit, heading by boys and girls under the age of 12 on the basis that younger heads and brains are more vulnerable.
 

Grecian68

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I'm not sure what the answer is to the problem associated with heading.

If for example, teams volunteer to reduce heading the ball in training, then that gives a distinct advantage to those teams that ignore this dictate.

If the risks are potentially as serious as claimed then the only solution would be to ban heading altogether. including in competitive matches.
Under this scenario I'm struggling to envisage what we would be left with ...
In walking football, the rule is no head height or over
 

Billy The Fish

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Are other sports examining themselves similarly ? Boxing maybe ?

Genuine question.
 

IBA

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Is it that necessary to have heading in training ?
That way the risk is reduced.

Certainly agree that heading should be discouraged for under 14s.
If you want competitive advantage it is.

If say a team hasnt practiced heading in training and other teams have and then your team loses a number of matches conceding numerous goals from headers, the natural reaction is to practice more headers!!!
 

Alistair20000

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This is a tough one with no obviously correct answer.

Yep those old heavy balls were an entirely different thing. Cannot have been good heading those too much.
 

jrg333

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Heading banned. VAR at every level of the pro game. Professional B teams in the lower leagues. And a European super league.

Future of football sounds great........
 
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